top of page

Presidents Without Borders Students Volunteer At Free Local Health Clinic

Vaishnavi Peyyety, Current Events Staff Writer



PWB in Peru on medical mission trip to Peru in 2017. Courtesy W&J Presidents Without Borders

DEC.5 - Washington&Jefferson College senior Rachel Karman is the leader of Presidents without Borders (PWB), a club dedicated to volunteering, fundraising, and mentoring students pursuing a science-related degree. This semester, PWB has taken on yet another powerful initiative at Jefferson Avenue Methodist Church where students help local physicians run a free clinic. This local church is only a few minutes away from campus and this free clinic serves residents from Washington county and beyond. PWB members also help with food and clothing donations. This volunteer experience takes place biweekly for two hours. W&J students are able to converse with patients, get to know people of various backgrounds, learn about their medical history, shadow physicians and take vitals including blood pressure, heart rate, and oxygen levels.

When interviewing Karman, she shared her belief that “It's so important to learn how you can help your community in areas they are struggling with. I think most students at W&J are privileged in ways we take for granted. This, to me, is an experience all pre-health students need to take advantage of because you learn how to have conversations with patients and also learn the ways in which our current mode of health access is falling short.”

“It's also important to realize you won't always have patients that can afford everything you prescribe to them, so this is a great exposure to necessary medicine compared to accessory medicine.” - Rachel Karman
Health disparities — rooted in social and economic inequities — are especially prevalent in underserved communities, as seen in parts of Washington county and the surrounding area. Karman states that “It's also important to realize you won't always have patients that can afford everything you prescribe to them, so this is a great exposure to necessary medicine compared to accessory medicine.”Surely this work is making a long-lasting impact on both the patients and the W&J students immersing themselves in this experience.
6 views0 comments

Comments


bottom of page